Sunday, September 27, 2015

American Insurgency Chapter 1.


American Insurgency

I have finished the second draft of my novel "American Insurgency." The story is about Jake Cohen, a former Special Forces Captain, who has returned home to New York City after 15 years of fighting insurgents and terrorists. He is angry when he finds out that Serbian gangsters have taken over his old neighborhood and threatened his father. He is frustrated and disappointed when he realizes that his wars are not over and soon finds himself in a fight with the Serbians. At the same time, he encounters his old high school girlfriend and learns that a relationship that he thought had ended almost 20 years ago still has unfinished business.

I have posted a link to the first chapter below. I am interested in feedback and possible
beta readers. Please let me hear from you if you read the chapter. 

 

The Customer Isn't Always Right.
      
Wednesday, June 5.
3 PM
"Almost as bad as Iraq," Jake muttered after glancing at the thermometer on the old Coca-Cola sign, which registered 94°. There had been record-breaking temperatures for the past week in Brighton Beach.
           As he placed a carton filled with jars of kosher pickles on a high shelf, perspiration ran down his face and soaked his "U.S. Army" T-shirt. He grabbed a bottle of water and emptied the remaining contents. He smiled as he remembered bellowing, "Stay hydrated, stay hydrated," to the new men in the company. His muscles ached, but a hot shower would ease most of the pain. Lifting weights when not on duty in Iraq and Afghanistan and climbing mountains on patrol, had kept him in peak condition.
           He thought about his dad's concern, late last night when he talked about Serbian gangsters who had become the crime lords of the neighborhood. The Serbians had seriously injured one of his dad's friends when he spoke out against them. Dealing with another gang was the last thing Jake wanted to do when he came home from the Army.
Yesterday, he had torn out the old, shabby storage compartments, which were on the verge of falling apart. Jake had just finished installing a series of reinforced steel shelving units, which added several cubic feet of accessible storage space. Jake's dad, Mickey, prided himself on being tough and strong, but at age sixty-five, his knees and back ached from decades of lifting heavy cartons.
Loud noises coming from the front of the deli caught his attention. He stepped through the back doorway and saw a short gangster built like a middle linebacker, holding the front door open as several customers raced by him.